Ayisha Malik, Carrie Ryan, Frances Hardinge, Kendare Blake, Kristen Cashore, Sophia Kingshill, Stark Holborn, Stephen King, YALC, Zen Cho

YALC buys!

Almost two weeks later and I’m still experiencing post-YALC depression. So here’s a list of some amazing-looking books I can’t wait to dig into to help me through the void that YALC left.

1sorcerer to the crown1. Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

I was watching a panel about genre-bending with Zen Cho. She made her novel sound absolutely enchanting – anything about sorcery in Britain and I’m there. I’m a very fussy reader and the fact that Cho sold her book to me in mere moments is an accomplishment. She was signing afterwards so I dashed to the Waterstone’s stall to buy a copy, but unfortunately they were sold out. I pulled out my phone straight away and ordered a copy. Glad to say I have this book now and I can’t wait to read it!

 

2bitterblue2. Bitterblue (Graceling Realm #3) by Kristin Cashore

One of the stalls was doing 2 for £10. Sorcery in Britain is one of my favourite things to read, the other being castles and princesses. So when I picked up this book, I had to buy it immediately – without even realising this is the third book in the series. Quickly rectified though as I bought the first two off eBay immediately afterwards. This series sounds mystical and I hope to read it ASAP. Which I say about every unread book on my bookshelf that I’ve been meaning to read for years, but still, one can hope.

 

3sofia khan3. Sofia Khan is Not Obliged (Sofia Khan #1) by Ayisha Malik

I received an ARC of the sequel to this a few months back (you can find my review here) and I was mesmerised. Sofia Khan is by far the funniest protagonist I’ve had the pleasure to come across in years. Described by Malik as the Muslim Bridget Jones, I cried laughing so hard reading the sequel that I had to go back and get this one. (And, of course, get both books signed by the lovely author who also happened to tell me I looked ethereal in my elf outfit.)

 

4forest4. The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan

This was the other book I bought in the 2 for £10 purchase, and it. Sounds. Amazing. Reminiscent of a favourite of mine (Uprooted by Naomi Novik), this novel is about Mary who lives in a village where it’s rumoured unsafe to leave, but Mary soon discovers that perhaps it’s not only the outside world that has its problems. This book is the first in the trilogy and sounds every bit enticing as the blurb promises. Stick around for the review in a few short months!

 

5lietree5. The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

I think I bought this one at 2 for £10 as well. This book follows Faith Sunderly whose family fled to an island following a scandal that ruined her father’s reputation. When her father is found murdered, Faith takes it upon herself to unravel the secret of his death and seek revenge. She comes across a tree that produces fruit every time she tells a lie, fruit that delivers to her truths, and hopes this brings her closer to unraveling the mystery her father left behind.

 

6threedarkcrowns6. Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

This was the other book I bought at 2 for £10. I wasn’t initially sold by the idea of this novel, which boils down to three sisters who ultimately have to kill each other for the crown. But the sales assistant did a number on me, and I had to have it by the time she was done. And like I said before – anything with queens in it, and I’m there. I can’t wait to find out which sister wins the deadly battle – Mirabella, the elemental; Katharine, the poisoner; or Arsinoe, the naturalist.

 

7revival7. Revival by Stephen King

I’ve never read a Stephen King book before. I’ve always meant to, but after watching The Shining as a very small child, I was kind of put off by anything Stephen Kingish. But also enticed at the same time. Which is why when Hodder & Stoughton was doing 3 for £5, I jumped in straight away. Somehow, I can do horror films. But horror books? I’m still scarred from reading Goosebumps as a child. Revival seemed like the softest of the Stephen King novels. I can’t wait to be too scared to sleep at night.

 

8onwriting8. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

So I’ve never read a Stephen King book before, and now I have two! I picked up this book because I appreciate Stephen King for the mastermind he is when it comes to his works and what he does. And as an aspiring author, I thought there’s no better person to take a few tips from than one of the bestselling authors of all time. While it’s impossible to review a memoir – something that’s personal to someone – I’ll write about everything I’ve learnt in the review to come.

 

9nunslinger9. Nunslinger by Stark Holborn

This was the last book I chose in the 3 for £5 sale. Another thing I’m a sucker for besides princesses and castles is historical fiction. This novel is set in the 1800s, and the protagonist, Sister Thomas Josephine, is on the run after being accused of murder – and trying to run from a man who has become dangerously obsessed with her.

This book encapsulates the twelve installments of the series, so there might be a bit of a wait for the review!

 

 

10betweentheravenandthedove10. Between the Raven and the Dove by Sophia Kingshill

I love magic in (almost) all of its shapes and forms, and this very YA novel is about just that. I had the chance to speak with the author and came away with this copy signed (bonus!!). Thirteen-year-old Mag has lived with her father in a home for mentally ill people. Suddenly, Mag’s real mother comes along to claim her – and tell her that she’s a witch. This story focuses on Mag’s world being turned upside down, and the lines blurring between good and evil.

 

So those were my YALC buys! In my defence, I don’t think I came away with as many books as my friends.

Are any of these books on your to-read list? Let me know in the comments!

Ayisha Malik, Ben Aaranovitch, Josephine Boyce, Lauren James, Patrice Lawrence, Patrick Ness, Samantha Shannon, V E Schwab, YALC, Zen Cho

YALC 2017

For those of you who don’t know, YALC is the Young Adult Literature Convention, and it’s taken place every year since 2014. This is a place where authors with a connection to YA and their readers congregate to, in short, have the best weekend ever.

Normally a three-day event, this convention is full to the brim with ARCs (advanced reader copies), free books, stalls selling books for less than RRP, and long, long queues for author signings.

This year, authors such as Samantha Shannon, V. E. Schwab, and Patrick Ness graced us with their presence. Samantha chaired a panel about genre-bending, which explored the difficulties of staying within any set genre, and the excitement of pushing the boundaries.

There’s a huge range of authors who attend YALC. Zen Cho and Ben Aaronovitch also made an appearance, and my friends helped Josephine Boyce man her stall and sell copies of her novels.

Lauren James explored unconventional romances on a panel with Ayisha Malik and Patrice Lawrence – tears and laughter ensued. The MuggleNet stall involved a series of Potterish tasks, such as dipping your hand in the Devil’s Snare to retrieve a lollipop, and guessing the number of winged keys. Hufflepuff won the House Cup – well, they do say there’s a first time for everything.

Benedict Cumberbatch and Natalie Dormer from London Film and Comic Con which was being held downstairs also graced us with their presence – numerous times. Sometimes they were greeted with squeals, but mostly a deadly hush fell over the vicinity, which was the tell-tale sign for someone famous appearing.

It’s definitely an event I would recommend to everyone. Personally, I’m not that huge a fan of YA, but I loved every minute of YALC. I loved getting to speak to authors, making a fool of myself in front of Benedict Cumberbatch, and, most of all, I’m going to enjoy posting the reviews for all the new books I bought!

(Seriously though, if you’re thinking of attending YALC next year, bring lots of cash. I came with over £80; I spent all of it and still had to use my debit card.)

5 Stars, Crime, Lauren Lee, Mystery

Bee Reviews: When Houses Burn by Laurèn Lee

whb1Format: Kindle edition

Expected publication: 15th August 2017 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Genres: Thriller, murder mystery

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | AmazonAuthor’s website


Synopsis

Dr. Delilah Hedley is a well-respected Doctor of Psychiatry in a small, affluent city on the East Coast. Despite her professional success, Delilah is physically unable to have children, causing increasing turmoil in her marriage.

When Delilah begins seeing a new patient, a man previously accused of murdering his parents, a woman is simultaneously found dead in the river. As the hunt for Jane Doe’s killer intensifies, Delilah falls deeper and deeper for her new patient, despite his dark past.

Will the doctor get a taste of her own medicine, or will she find an escape from the flame in time to save her own life?


Review

A copy of this novel was given in exchange for an honest review.

It’s unbelievable to think there is this much talent in one author. This novel was so carefully crafted, and completely defied my own expectations – as Lee undoubtedly intended. Lee players on the readers’ assumptions really well to make the characters hugely complex and at the same time, suspiciously simple. I was caught out numerous times throughout this novel.

The plot is wild, which at first I wasn’t overly fond of, until I realised that this comes with the territory of writing a thriller, and the quickly-thickening plot is a sign of creativity more than anything else.

They say “Everything happens for a reason,” but what is the reason for this? Why has fate brought us here, to this place filled with doubt, misery, and unhappiness?

The way the novel is written was, at first, a tad confusing but this is mostly due to the fact that I wasn’t paying attention to chapter headings because I was so deeply engrossed in reading the novel. I hate to think how much time was spent writing it – and I managed to finish reading it in three hours.

I would definitely recommend this to fans of thriller/crime/murder mystery novels – and put all of your assumptions aside because things aren’t always as they seem, and people can surprise you.

4 Stars, Alison Weir, Book review, Historical fiction

Bee Reviews: Anne Boleyn: A King’s Obsession (Six Tudor Queens, #2) by Alison Weir

ab1Format: Kindle edition

Published: 18th May 2017 by Headline

Genres: Historical fiction

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | Amazon | Waterstones | Wordery


Synopsis

A novel filled with new insights into the story of Henry VIII’s second—and most infamous—wife, Anne Boleyn. The second book in the epic Six Tudor Queens series, from the acclaimed historian and bestselling author of Katherine of Aragon.

It is the spring of 1527. Henry VIII has come to Hever Castle in Kent to pay court to Anne Boleyn. He is desperate to have her. For this mirror of female perfection he will set aside his Queen and all Cardinal Wolsey’s plans for a dynastic French marriage.

Anne Boleyn is not so sure. She loathes Wolsey for breaking her betrothal to the Earl of Northumberland’s son, Harry Percy, whom she had loved. She does not welcome the King’s advances; she knows that she can never give him her heart.

But hers is an opportunist family. And whether Anne is willing or not, they will risk it all to see their daughter on the throne…


Review

A copy of this novel was given in exchange for an honest review.

Okay so I’ve never picked up Phillipa Gregory book in my life even though I have all twelve of her books on my shelves, but I think Alison Weir can give me my fix of Tudor historical fiction novels.

Where do I start with this book? It was enormously long, it took me several weeks to finish, but I enjoyed almost every minute of it. Weir’s writing had a way of magically transporting me 500 years back in time. My experience of reading this novel has implanted scenes in my mind as clear as memory – the views from Hever Castle, the hustle and bustle of Margaret of Austria’s court, every turn of the page was a new experience.

I thought I knew a lot about the Tudors prior to reading this book, but how I was wrong. There was so much to learn, and the facts made this novel all the more interesting. This is Weir, an acclaimed historian, weaving together the facts of Anne Boleyn’s life with a bit of imagination to deliver a novel that’s thrilling from start through until finish.

The only bit that was frustrating as a reader was the length of the novel allocated to Anne Boleyn’s wait for Catherine of Aragon’s and Henry’s marriage to be dissolved. But I think this is a great reflection on how frustrated Anne Boleyn probably felt. I also wasn’t sure about Henry’s characterisation at first, but it was interesting to see the renowned monarch in a different portrayal to that which I had initially imagined.

I would definitely recommend this detail-packed novel to others interested in historical fiction, and I can’t wait to read the prequel Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen.

4 Stars, Book review, Colleen Hoover, Contemporary, Romance

Bee Reviews: It Ends With Us by Colleen Hoover

it ends with us

Format: Kindle edition, 367 pages

Published: 2nd August by Atria Books

Genres: Romance, contemporary

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | Amazon | Wordery


Synopsis

Lily hasn’t always had it easy, but that’s never stopped her from working hard for the life she wants. She’s come a long way from the small town in Maine where she grew up – she graduated from college, moved to Boston, and started her own business. So when she feels a spark with a gorgeous neurosurgeon named Ryle Kincaid, everything in Lily’s life suddenly seems almost too good to be true.

Ryle is assertive, stubborn, and maybe even a little arrogant. He’s also sensitive, brilliant, and has a total soft spot for Lily, but Ryle’s complete aversion to relationships is disturbing.

As questions about her new relationship overwhelm her, so do thoughts of Atlas Corrigan – her first love and a link to the past she left behind. He was her kindred spirit, her protector. When Atlas suddenly reappears, everything Lily has built with Ryle is threatened.

With this bold and deeply personal novel, Colleen Hoover delivers a heart-wrenching story that breaks exciting new ground for her as a writer. It Ends With Us is an unforgettable tale of love that comes at the ultimate price.


Review

Warning: This review contains spoilers and also trigger-warnings for domestic violence.

Okay, so I have very mixed feelings with regards to this book. At first, I’ll be honest, I couldn’t stand it. I loved finding out about Atlas, but that was it. For the first half of the novel, I crawled through it. I hated Ryle, I hated who Lily was when she was with Ryle – but I hated all of this more in the second half of the novel, and this was a good thing.

Imagine all the people you meet in your life. There are so many. They come in like waves, trickling in and out with the tide. Some waves are much bigger and make more of an impact than others. Sometimes the waves bring with them things from deep in the bottom of the sea and they leave those things tossed onto the shore. Imprints against the grains of sand that prove the waves had once been there, long after the tide recedes.

Writing about domestic abuse isn’t easy. Hoover should be commended for writing this in a sensitve, hollistic way. The only thing I didn’t like was how everything worked out so easily. Lily had money, she wasn’t forced to go to work. But this would have been a whole different novel of its own.

I don’t think this is a romance novel. This isn’t about either of Lily’s two love interests. This is about Lily Blossom Bloom (yes, that is her real name) breaking the cycle of abuse, and I’ve never been more proud of a fictional character.

Cycles exist because they are excruciating to break. It takes an astronomical amount of pain and courage to disrupt a familiar pattern. Sometimes it seems easier to just keep running in the same familiar circles, rather than facing the fear of jumping and possibly not landing on your feet.

It’s easy to love someone, slightly less so after they’ve wronged you, but it’s harder still to love yourself enough to leave someone who has hurt you. Lily got there eventually, and it was no easy feat, but she demonstrates the devastating effects of abuse, both from the experience as a bystander, and as a survivor.

Just because someone hurts you doesn’t mean you can simply stop loving them. It’s not a person’s actions that hurt the most. It’s the love. If there was no love attached to the action, the pain would be a little easier to bear.

I’m not sure that this is a book I would read again, but it’s certainly one that everyone should read and take lessons from, which, as Hoover says, is the purpose of the book. It’s not so much for entertainment, but a journey of personal growth in itself.

4 Stars, Book review, Haley Harrigan, Mystery

Bee Reviews: Secrets of Southern Girls by Haley Harrigan

ssgFormat: Kindle edition, 400 pages

Published: 6th June 2017 by Sourcebooks Landmark

Genres: Mystery, contemporary

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | Amazon | Wordery


Synopsis

Ten years ago, Julie Portland accidentally killed her best friend, Reba. What’s worse is she got away with it. Consumed by guilt, she left the small town of Lawrence Mill, Mississippi, and swore nothing would ever drag her back. Now, raising her daughter and struggling to make ends meet in Manhattan, Julie still can’t forget the ghost of a girl with golden hair and a dangerous secret.

When August, Reba’s first love, begs Julie to come home to find the diary that Reba kept all those years ago, Julie’s past comes creeping back to haunt her. That diary could expose the shameful memories Julie has been running from, but it could also unearth the hidden truths that Reba left buried…and reveal that Julie isn’t the only one who feels responsible for Reba’s death.


Review

A copy of this novel was given in exchange for an honest review.

This book is quite an easy one to get into, filled with mysteries large and small that keep the reader enticed. Harrigan has a way of knowing what the reader wants and gives it to them.

The novel is set in two thrilling locations – the fast-paced New York City, and the much slower, sleepier small town of Lawrence Mill. Slow and sleepy, but also full of secrets, which is what the main character, Julie, is here to unravel.

Unfortunately, the novel is quite predictable at times. At least, I found that I could predict the bigger mysteries and things that would happen next. But perhaps that isn’t necessarily a bad thing, in a world where people try too hard to produce something that will make a huge impact.

I would definitely recommend this novel for people who are looking for a comparatively light mystery to delve into.

 

4 Stars, A J Mackenzie, Book review, Crime, Historical fiction, Mystery

Bee Reviews: The Body in the Ice (Romney Marsh Mystery #2) by A J Mackenzie

the body in the ice coverFormat: Kindle edition

Published: 20th April 2017 by Bonnier Zaffre

Genres: Historical fiction, Mystery, Crime

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | Amazon | Waterstones


Synopsis

Christmas Day, Kent, 1796

On the frozen fields of Romney Marsh stands New Hall; silent, lifeless, deserted. In its grounds lies an unexpected Christmas offering: a corpse, frozen into the ice of a horse pond.

It falls to the Reverend Hardcastle, justice of the peace in St Mary in the Marsh, to investigate. But with the victim’s identity unknown, no murder weapon and no known motive, it seems like an impossible task. Working along with his trusted friend, Amelia Chaytor, and new arrival Captain Edward Austen, Hardcastle soon discovers there is more to the mystery than there first appeared.

With the arrival of an American family torn apart by war and desperate to reclaim their ancestral home, a French spy returning to the scene of his crimes, ancient loyalties and new vengeance combine to make Hardcastle and Mrs Chaytor’s attempts to discover the secret of New Hall all the more dangerous.

The Body in the Ice, with its unique cast of characters, captivating amateur sleuths and a bitter family feud at its heart, is a twisting tale that vividly brings to life eighteenth-century Kent and draws readers into its pages.


Review

A copy of this novel was given in exchange for an honest review.

I think I’ve found my new favourite crime series. Aside from the fact that the setting of this novel is local to me, which has an appeal in itself, everything about The Body in the Ice is perfect.

Widow Amelia Chaytor and Reverend Hardcastle are my favourite detective duo. They’re fun, witty and solving a mystery alongside them was a thrilling experience. The Mackenzie team have a way with magic that makes even the minor characters lovable and endearing, from Rodolpho the Cowardly Dog, to her endearing if a little mad mistress, Capurnia.

There’s an art to writing a crime novel and these authors possess it. Everything from the carefully crafted characters to their pasts and the particular roles they play in the novel. The Mackenzie team are meticulous authors and this quality goes a long way in their writing.

I can’t wait to dive into the prequel, The Body on the Doorstep, and the sequel, The Body on the Boat when it’s released!

4 Stars, Book review, Crime, Historical fiction, Horror, Lauren A Forry, Mystery

Bee Reviews: Abigale Hall by Lauren A Forry

abigale hall coverFormat: Kindle edition, 376 pages

Published: April 11th 2017 by Skyhorse Publishing

Genres: Historical fiction, Gothic, Crime, Mystery, Horror

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | Amazon | Waterstones | Wordery


Synopsis

Amidst the terror of the Second World War, seventeen-year-old Eliza and her troubled little sister Rebecca have had their share of tragedy, losing their mother to the Blitz and their father to suicide. But when they are forced to leave London to work for the mysterious Mr Brownawell at Abigale Hall, they find that the worst is yet to come…

There are tales that the ghost of Mr Brownawell’s bride-to-be haunts the desolate mansion, and in the village there are shocking rumours of maidservants meeting a terrible fate within its walls. But is it superstition that Eliza should be afraid of or is there something real and deadly lurking in the dark, dusty rooms of Abigale Hall? Yet vicious, cold-hearted housekeeper Mrs Pollard will stop at nothing to keep the mansion’s terrible secrets, and she exerts a twisted hold over Rebecca.

To save herself and her sister descending into madness, Eliza must wage a desperate battle to escape back to London and uncover the horrifying truth before Abigale Hall claims two more victims. Taut and suspenseful, Abigale Hall is a thrilling debut from Lauren A. Forry.


Review

A copy of this novel was given in exchange for an honest review.

It’s difficult to believe that this is a debut novel because, really, it’s too good to be true. This novel was fast paced all the way through with the author giving away enough to keep you guessing – but never more than that.

Packed with horror among other things that will send chills running down your spine, Abigale Hall is everything it should be of its genre, plus a little more. There were times when I was clutching my Kindle close to me, screaming in anticipation, something that no novel has ever made me do before.

There are more mysteries for Eliza to unravel than that of Victoria’s ghost, Mr Brownawell’s wife-to-be before she met her untimely death. Rebecca, Eliza’s sister, is a mystery in herself, as well as the lingering question of what really brought Eliza and Rebecca to the haunted manor in the first place. And will Peter, Eliza’s sweetheart, ever make it to save the two girls?

Everything about Abigale Hall is well thought out, and if this is Forry’s debut novel, I can’t wait to see what else she churns out. Dripping with suspense right the way through, I would definitely recommend this to fans of horror/mystery stories.

Warning: if you’re going to delve into this novel, just remember, fairytale endings don’t exist.

5 Stars, Book review, Fantasy, Samantha Shannon, Sci-Fi

Bee Reviews: The Song Rising by Samantha Shannon (The Bone Season #3)

the song rising alternate cover

Format: Kindle edition, 384 pages

Published: March 7th 2017 by Bloomsbury

Genre(s): Fantasy, Sci-Fi

Rating:  ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | Amazon | Waterstones | Wordery


Synopsis

Following a bloody battle against foes on every side, Paige Mahoney has risen to the dangerous position of Underqueen, ruling over London’s criminal population.

But, having turned her back on Jaxon Hall and with vengeful enemies still at large, the task of stabilising the fractured underworld has never seemed so challenging.

Little does Paige know that her reign may be cut short by the introduction of Senshield, a deadly technology that spells doom for the clairvoyant community and the world as they know it…


Review

I have to admit, I was anxious to read this book for the same reason the author was anxious to write it: the fear of being let down/letting people down. I thought back to all the TV shows I’ve ever watched where the first couple of series were amazing and then suddenly it went downhill and you wonder where it went wrong. But this? You can tell how in touch Shannon is with her characters and her world that she managed to produce another fabulous novel. There’s an art to writing a series, and much more so a septology (further reading: J. K. Rowling), that few writers can master – and Shannon is right up there with them.

The third book in the series is every bit action-packed as promised. I’ve been busted a few times by colleagues at work from where I’ve been unable to stow my Kindle away quick enough because this book is just that good. There’s a lot of world-expanding here as there have been in the first two books which some authors might find off-putting to write about but Shannon takes it in her stride.

I imagined, too. And so imagination became my nemesis; my mind created monsters out of nothing.

To put into perspective just how much I love this book: I rarely delve into the fantasy genre anymore. I’ve been let down time and time again by fantasy / YA authors (and you only have to scroll back a few posts for an example). But this is the one fantasy series I would recommend to anyone who’s never tried out the genre before. Everything is just extraordinarily thought out, you could almost believe it were real – and that’s before you compare the political agenda of Scion 2059 to real life 2017.

Another favourite about this novel is that Shannon doesn’t do the typical fantasy / YA thing and kill for shock value. Everything is calculated and you could almost believe Shannon cares as much about her characters’ welfare as the typical overly-emotional reader (such as myself). That said, I did nearly cry on the bus when a character died – as often is the case in war – but it would have been unrealistic if no one ever died.

What I will tell you is that you cannot force yourself to mourn. Sometimes, the best way to honour the dead is to simply keep living. In war, it is the only way.

Needless to say, I can’t wait for the remaining four novels, and if there’s a two-year gap between each novel, then so be it. A masterpiece doesn’t happen overnight, and I’m glad to witness the creative journey that is The Bone Season series.

My only qualm with this novel is that everyone knows going from Folkestone to Calais is much better than going from Dover to Calais, but I might just be showing my roots here.

4 Stars, Book review, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, William Horwood

Bee Reviews: Hyddenworld (Spring) by William Horwood

hyddenworld william horwoodFormat: Paperback, 505 pages

Published: January 1st 2011 by Pan Publishing (first published January 1st 2009)

Genre(s): Fantasy, Sci-Fi

Rating:  ★ ★ ★ ★

Goodreads | Amazon


Synopsis

It has lain lost and forgotten for fifteen hundred years in the ancient heartland of England – a scrap of glass and metal melded by fierce fire. It is the lost core of a flawless Sphere made by the greatest of the Anglo-Saxon CraeftLords in memory of the one he loved. Her name was Spring and contained in the very heart of this work is a spark from the Fires of Creation.

But while humans have lost their belief in such things, the Hydden – little people existing on the borders of our world – have not. Breaking the silence of centuries they send one of their own, a young boy, Jack, to live among humans in the hope that he may one day find what has been lost for so long. His journey leads him to Katherine, a girl he rescues from a tragic accident – it’s a meeting that will change everything. It is only through their voyage into the dangerous Hyddenworld that they will realize their destiny, find love and complete the great quest that will save both their worlds from destruction.

Their journey begins with Spring…


Review

This book had me feeling mixed emotions initially. It’s very confusing, so, readers, sit tight! This is by no means a light read, but a very rewarding one. Horwood has an exceptional imagination, and his style of writing is otherworldly. This is a comment recycled over and over again by critics, but there truly is something Tolkienish about Horwood’s writing.

The things I didn’t like about this book include that it was confusing, long-winded, said something in several chapters that could have been written in one. Again – very Tolkienish. There was also something magical, enchanting, bewitching about this novel, and I can’t wait to continue the adventure in the sequels! I hope they’re just as spectacular, and the reading experience is just as enthralling as it has been for this one.